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Fall 2022 Survey - Design Options

Please take this brief survey to share your thoughts on the proposed improvements along Fourth Plain Blvd and Fort Vancouver Way. 

Background

Design Options Overview 

Over 300 crashes have occurred on Fourth Plain Blvd between 2018 to 2020, making it the most unsafe corridor in the City. The City has identified three (3) design options that can be done to improve safety and mobility along the corridor without widening the existing roadway by repurposing a traffic lane. These design options could be constructed in 2023 and 2024 as part of already planned paving projects. The City is exploring the following key improvements to make these streets safer and more comfortable for all travelers:  

  • Paving and pothole repair: Fourth Plain Blvd and Fort Vancouver Way will be repaved in 2023 and 2024 as part of the City's existing paving program. Repairing and repaving the street will make it safer and more comfortable to drive, bike, and ride the bus along the corridor. 
  • Lane reconfigurations: The City is considering repurposing a travel lane (also called a “lane reconfiguration") to install new or buffered bike lanes and/or bus and right turn only lanes along the corridor. Traffic analysis shows that repurposing a travel lane would result in similar vehicle travel times as today due to improved bus, bike, and pedestrian operations and rerouting of some through traffic onto routes like SR 500. Lane reconfigurations have been implemented in many communities across the northwest and have proven benefits such as a reduction in crashes, increased business revenue, and increased numbers of people walking and biking. 
  • Improved crossings: The City is exploring ways to make it safer to cross Fourth Plain Blvd and Fort Vancouver Way. Improvements could include repairing and restriping existing crossings. The City also has a separate project to design two new crosswalks that will be installed in the future. 
  • Improved bike lanes: The existing striped bike lanes on these streets are inconsistent and do not provide any physical separation from moving traffic. The City is developing design options for filling in these existing gaps and exploring treatments to provide greater physical separation between bikes and traffic. Buffered bike lanes also increase pedestrian safety by creating more distance between the existing sidewalks and vehicle traffic.  
  • Bus and right turn only lanes: The Vine currently operate in mixed traffic with cars, sometimes slowing down both the bus and drivers. Bus and right turn only lanes (also known as “Business Access and Transit (BAT)” lanes) would create dedicated space for buses and right-turning vehicles only, improving bus reliability and increasing safety for all users.BAT lanes improve pedestrian safety by creating more distance between the existing sidewalks and vehicle traffic.


The City is exploring ways of improving bike safety using treatments like buffered bike lanes (image left) that create more space between drivers and cyclists. Bus and right turn only lanes (image right) would dedicate space for buses and for cars turning onto side roads, businesses, or driveways. 


Lane Reconfigurations  

To implement these treatments, the City is considering repurposing a travel lane (also called a “lane reconfiguration) to install new or buffered bike lanes and/or bus and right turn only lanes along the corridorTraffic analysis shows that repurposing a travel lane would result in similar vehicle travel times as today due to improved bus, bike, and pedestrian operations and rerouting of some through traffic onto routes like SR 500. Lane reconfigurations have been implemented in many communities across the northwest and have proven benefits, including: 

  • Safety improvements: 20% - 50% reduction in crashes, reduced vehicle speeds, reduction in aggressive driving. 
  • Increases in business revenue: a lane reconfiguration project in Spokane resulted in 10% increase in sales tax revenue.  
  • Creating a more comfortable environment for people walking and biking: some projects have resulted in over 100% increase in people walking and biking after implementation.