East McLoughlin Boulevard Safety Improvement Project

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Vancouver City Council has identified East McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Brandt Road as a priority corridor for safety improvements for all users in the City’s Strategic Plan and its Complete Streets Policy.

In summer 2019, the City made the following improvements on East McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Brandt Road in central Vancouver:


Added buffered bike lanes to McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Grand Boulevard

Preserved existing sharrows, or shared lane bicycle markings, on McLoughlin Boulevard between Grand Boulevard and Brandt Road

Added speed cushions (similar to speed bumps) to McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Brandt Road

Added two enhanced pedestrian crossings to McLoughlin Boulevard at 32nd Avenue and 13th Street, with flashing lights that are activated when you push a button to cross the street


These improvements are intended to reduce speeding and collisions on McLoughlin Boulevard and to make the street safer and feel more comfortable for people who bike, walk, and take C-TRAN. They were developed thanks to community feedback received in 2018.

The speed cushions and enhanced pedestrian crossings are permanent additions. The buffered bike lanes and bicycle sharrows are part of a pilot project that the City will be evaluating to determine whether the pilot project has been effective. Based on the results of this evaluation, the City will then decide whether the protected bike lanes and sharrows should remain the same, change, or be removed.

This evaluation will include traffic counts for people walking, biking, and driving; parking use studies; and feedback from people living and traveling in the area.

The City will also coordinate with community stakeholders such as the Washington State School for the Blind, neighborhood associations, C-TRAN, the post office, and others to better understand their experience with the pilot project.

Please use the public engagement tools below to provide feedback to the City on pilot project improvements (the buffered bike lanes and bicycle sharrows).

You can learn more about the project background and sign up to receive email updates on the project website.


Vancouver City Council has identified East McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Brandt Road as a priority corridor for safety improvements for all users in the City’s Strategic Plan and its Complete Streets Policy.

In summer 2019, the City made the following improvements on East McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Brandt Road in central Vancouver:


Added buffered bike lanes to McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Grand Boulevard

Preserved existing sharrows, or shared lane bicycle markings, on McLoughlin Boulevard between Grand Boulevard and Brandt Road

Added speed cushions (similar to speed bumps) to McLoughlin Boulevard between Reserve Street and Brandt Road

Added two enhanced pedestrian crossings to McLoughlin Boulevard at 32nd Avenue and 13th Street, with flashing lights that are activated when you push a button to cross the street


These improvements are intended to reduce speeding and collisions on McLoughlin Boulevard and to make the street safer and feel more comfortable for people who bike, walk, and take C-TRAN. They were developed thanks to community feedback received in 2018.

The speed cushions and enhanced pedestrian crossings are permanent additions. The buffered bike lanes and bicycle sharrows are part of a pilot project that the City will be evaluating to determine whether the pilot project has been effective. Based on the results of this evaluation, the City will then decide whether the protected bike lanes and sharrows should remain the same, change, or be removed.

This evaluation will include traffic counts for people walking, biking, and driving; parking use studies; and feedback from people living and traveling in the area.

The City will also coordinate with community stakeholders such as the Washington State School for the Blind, neighborhood associations, C-TRAN, the post office, and others to better understand their experience with the pilot project.

Please use the public engagement tools below to provide feedback to the City on pilot project improvements (the buffered bike lanes and bicycle sharrows).

You can learn more about the project background and sign up to receive email updates on the project website.


Share Your Story

This is the place where you can share your own personal story about living and/or traveling on McLoughlin Boulevard with the buffered bike lanes and bicycle sharrows. What do you like? What frustrates you?

Please note that your story will be visible to all users of this website shortly after you submit it.


Thank you for sharing your story about living or traveling on East McLoughlin Boulevard.

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    McLoughlin "Improvements

    by Street Watcher, 5 months ago

    McLoughlin Blvd. is so user unfriendly that most people are trying to figure out some other ways to get home using alternative streets. I see way less traffic because I think everyone is frustrated by the uneven speed bumps. I guess it causes those few people to slow down because they are so afraid of them. I've followed people who slow down to about 12 mph going over them and the bumps are so close together. I usually drive down Mill Plain and turn on Grand just to avoid the lion's share of those ugly bumps.

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    Failing Grade

    by DowntownCouver, 6 months ago

    So I just drove the McLoughlin project area for the first time. Here are my impressions:

    1. It seems the city has inexplicably targeted McLoughlin on the wrong side of Reserve for these "improvements". McLoughlin east of Reserve has some natural traffic calming features, west of Reserve not so much.

    2. The design incorporates bizarre features, like speed humps in uphill portions of bike lane, and bus stops that block the bike lane. Scary, painful, and dangerous.

    3. Overall, it seems less safe for cyclists than it was before, and unnecessarily tough for drivers. And what about the sidewalks? They... Continue reading

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