A Stronger Vancouver

A Stronger Vancouver. Investing in our future.In May 2017, Vancouver City Council convened an Executive Sponsors Council (ESC) to work with the City and the community to develop recommendations for a range of projects and programs intended to keep our city thriving over the next decade.

After two years of work, the ESC developed a proposed plan called A Stronger Vancouver. The City is currently wrapping up several months of community engagement work, which included three open houses, tabling at local events and community centers, an online survey and focus groups.


Submit Feedback

You can submit feedback about the Stronger Vancouver initiative to the City by email at StrongerVancouver@cityofvancouver.us.



A Stronger Vancouver. Investing in our future.In May 2017, Vancouver City Council convened an Executive Sponsors Council (ESC) to work with the City and the community to develop recommendations for a range of projects and programs intended to keep our city thriving over the next decade.

After two years of work, the ESC developed a proposed plan called A Stronger Vancouver. The City is currently wrapping up several months of community engagement work, which included three open houses, tabling at local events and community centers, an online survey and focus groups.


Submit Feedback

You can submit feedback about the Stronger Vancouver initiative to the City by email at StrongerVancouver@cityofvancouver.us.



Submit your questions about the Stronger Vancouver initiative here. City staff will respond as soon as possible.

Q&A

  • What are you doing to assure the City’s operational viability during a major disaster? If the bridge goes down and the electrical grid is out, then you should not expect gas to be available to run generators. Every city building should have solar panels (wind turbines where feasible) and a battery wall. Community centers, fire stations, police stations, schools, the operations center, etc., should all be places where we can go for shelter in a major disaster. But without power, they aren’t going to be much help.

    Martha asked 3 months ago

    City of Vancouver Utilities have emergency response plans, procedures and contingencies in place that would be activated in the event of a disaster. The Stronger Vancouver also initiative includes a plan to build a new Operations Center to replace the outdated existing facilities, which would be significantly compromised even in a moderate seismic event.

    In the case of a major disaster, locations where emergency operations are being conducted will need to focus immediately on first response, and therefore, would not be appropriate for use as public shelters. The City is working with the American Red Cross and other community partners to develop options for shelter and mass care sites if the need arises. 

    However, in the case of a major disaster, not everyone will be able to get to a shelter or get help immediately. For that reason, preparedness of individuals and households is the key ingredient for minimizing the impact of a major disaster on communities. FEMA-designed training helps empower individuals to lend support, potentially saving lives before professional help arrives (visit www.ready.gov for more information).

  • Will these new projects be voted on? Will property taxes be raised gradually, or all at once? Why don’t you discuss the price tag when you discuss these projects?

    Chicken asked 3 months ago

    The City Council has not yet made any decisions on what projects, programs or funding sources to move forward. The Council will consider public feedback as they continue their deliberations on what a final package will look like. The recommendation made to City Council includes a recommendation on a variety of  funding sources for Council’s consideration, including a voted property tax to fund the capital projects.

    The proposal from the Executive Sponsors Council includes a funding recommendation with a spreadsheet detailing the estimated costs for each of the projects and programs. To make this information easier to access, it has been pulled out and included as a separate page on the website: https://www.strongervancouver.org/costs. The City Council has not yet made any decisions on what projects, programs or funding sources to move forward. The Council will consider public feedback as they continue their deliberations on what a final package will look like.

  • Why are there no resources to support tenant rights in Vancouver? ConAm/Pathfinder Partners, who bought Creekside Village, are discriminating against families and the residents have to hire a lawyer because Vancouver does not have any resources to make sure the businesses they give TAX BREAKS to actually follow the laws and treat the tax PAYERS of Vancouver as the law dictates.

    Major PJ asked 4 months ago

    We were not aware that Creekside Village had been purchased by ConAm/Pathfinder Partners, but neither entity has received any public funding or tax breaks through or from the City.

    For issues regarding tenant rights here locally, people have had success contacting the Volunteer Lawyers Program at 360-695-5313 or the Northwest Justice Project at 360-693-6130. Additionally, you can file a fair housing complaint with the Fair Housing Center of Washington (https://fhcwashington.org/| Phone: 253-274-9523 or toll free at 844-557-6322); the Washington State Human Rights Commission (https://www.hum.wa.gov/fair-housing or 800-233-3247); and/or the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) (https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/fair_housing_equal_opp or 202-708-1112).

    If you would like more information, please feel free to call the City’s Community and Economic Development Programs Manger Peggy Sheehan at 360-487-7952.

  • Will any of these funds go towards the 6 year transportation improvement program that will bring streets like NE 18th and SE 192nd up to urban standards?

    lesliestevenson976 asked 4 months ago

    Funding for these street projects is not included in the Stronger Vancouver initiative because Vancouver City Council has already implemented a funding strategy for them.

    In late 2015, following an extensive public outreach effort, the Vancouver City Council adopted a series of new revenue sources for transportation needs collectively called the Streets Funding Strategy. 

    A key component of the Streets Funding Strategy is a $40 license tab fee, which goes to the City's Transportation Benefit District. The Transportation Benefit District funds are the primary source of revenue for projects within the City's Six-Year Transportation Improvement Program, including 18th Street and 192nd Avenue. 

    Learn more about the Streets Funding Strategy.